It’s not easy for parents to send off their children to sleep-away camp. Besides being a tremendous expense, it’s emotionally taxing to send a child away for four or eight weeks. Yet, parents do so, in the hope that their children will have the summer of their lives.

Throughout my youth, I enjoyed Country Yossi’s Kivi and Tuki children tapes. On one of the tapes, Country Yossi annoyedly asks Tuki why he can’t get him into bed at night, but then can’t get him out of bed in the morning. Tuki replies that it is one of the many unanswerable mysteries of life.

Last week, the morning before we left on a trip, our head counselor here in Camp Dora Golding, Rabbi A.C. Posner, shared with the campers a post from a Sullivan County Facebook page that was making its rounds. It was written by Ann-Marie Barton, a non-Jewish bus driver who had driven a group of frum boys on a trip and was incredibly impressed:

It’s one of those things that happen to someone else. When you hear it, you shake your head and express your sympathy and breathe a sigh of relief that it was someone else, and not you. But last week it happened to me.

 Rabbi Noach Sauber, a seasoned and popular educator and a personal mentor of mine, is the Assistant Principal and Head of Judaic Studies at RTMA [the Rav Teitz Mesivta Academy] in Elizabeth, New Jersey, as well as the Learning Director here in Camp Dora Golding.

Sunday afternoons during May and June are dedicated to Pirchei Baseball. Every grade has its own teams and games. As the boys get older, the games become more competitive and intense, especially for the parents. That’s why I really enjoy watching the pre-1Aers, the youngest boys, play; their games are pleasant and unpressured. I saw it when our oldest son Shalom was in pre-1A years ago, then again with our second son Avi, and this year, with our third son, Dovid.