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Every now and then, an article appears that is so disturbing it burns every fiber of your being. It is just more “rubbish,” as the British call it, or “fake news,” as the President would have it. Most of the time, it is wiser to simply dismiss it and write it off. Why call attention to a grotesquely obnoxious op-ed that has its sole aim to cause trouble and highlight the theater of the absurd?

Nike came up with a great expression used in all of their advertisements, which has had a profound influence on the world. Their motto is “Just do it.” I say to the State of Israel and to the US administration, in reference to applying sovereignty over Judea, Samaria, and the Jordan Valley: “Just do it.” This is the right time. The longer one waits, the more the naysayers have time to apply pressure and make trouble.

I remember the 1960s – and it was nothing like this. America is aflame and it is in trouble. It’s time for both a Bible lesson and a history lesson.

With the decision by the American Museum of Natural History in New York, in conjunction with the Mayor, to remove the equestrian statue of President Theodore Roosevelt, it is time to revisit the life of this exceptional human being. As the 26th President of the United States (1901-1909), he combined his life as a crusader for truth, an outdoorsman, naturalist, Police Commissioner, soldier, Assistant Secretary of the Navy and Vice President into one spectacular synthesis and tapestry. The reason his monument stood from 1940 till now in front of the American Museum of Natural History is that he did more for wildlife preservation than any other President.

Politics and medicine do not mix. After two major studies on COVID-19 were retracted for faulty data, it once again proves that politics has no place in medicine. Medicine has to be driven by science; it is all about saving lives. Politics should never be allowed to enter the arena. The British Journal Lancet has been a notoriously bad actor, often injecting politics in its selection of articles for publication.

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