Parshah

Living For Others

Noach had three sons, each with different meanings behind their names. The name Shem infers that...

Read more: Living For...

Every night in Maariv, we say, “v’haseir satan milfaneinu u’mei’achareinu.” This can be understood as follows. When we desire to perform a mitzvah and are stopped, this is the direct action of the satan standing upright before us.

The Ben Ish Chai comments on this week’s parshah that the reason that Hashem changes Avram’s name to Avraham is because everything Hashem does is for the best. If you take the letters of the Avos – Avraham, Yitzchak, and Yaakov – it totals 13 letters. If you take all four Imahos – Sarah, Rivkah, Rachel, and Leah – it also comes out to 13 letters. Thirteen plus 13 equal 26 – the numerical equivalent of Hashem’s name. Now we understand one of the reasons why Hashem added the letter hei: Otherwise we wouldn’t have been able to have this calculation.

Noach had three sons, each with different meanings behind their names. The name Shem infers that you should have a shem tov, a good name. Cham's name refers to the trait of being warm with others; Yefes is defined as being nice. It is important to note that the name "Noach" features the attribute of spreading one’s charm to all whom one encounters. The Orthodox Queens Jewish community is privileged to have within its rabbinic leadership HaRav Noach Isaac Oelbaum, whose magnetic charisma has captivated world Jewry of all backgrounds. Chazaq is fortunate to have the adam gadol on as its posek.

Hachnasas orchim, inviting guests into one’s home and around their table, is a beautiful mitzvah with a powerful messageFollowing his bris milah, Avraham Avinu experienced tremendous discomfort, yet our formative father stood focused on opening the doors of his tent to others in need of hospitality. One can discern that a tzadik is never satisfied from past accomplishments and always seeks new ways to make a lasting impact. This concept is true of the sages from every generation, giving us an impetus to act similarly.

The first human being at the time of Creation is named Adam. We see the word “adam” comes from the Hebrew word “adamah.” “Adamah” means dirt, the ground. The next time someone calls you a piece of dirt, tell him he’s right, because we all come from the ground. Why was the first person called “dirt”? What a derogatory name! We couldn’t find a better name?? Just as when we water the soil, care for it, and give it the right sunlight, it turns into fruits, flowers, and vegetables, so, too, with a person: If a person doesn’t take care of himself, he will be nothing. But if a person stays near good people and has the “right light,” he can grow into something great.