Congresswoman Grace Meng Responds To Jewish Community

Question: Should a minyan with a chasan getting married later that day recite Tachanun?

Short Answer: While the chasan should not recite Tachanun, some poskim require the minyan to recite Tachanun, especially if the chupah is not until after sh’kiah. However, the minhag has developed to not recite Tachanun.

Explanation:

I. Wedding on Same Day

The T’rumas HaDeshen (P’sakim 80) writes that when a chasan who is getting married later that day attends a minyan, the minyan should not recite Tachanun, because it is a holiday for the chasan. The T’rumas HaDeshen compares this situation to not reciting LaM’natzei’ach in Shacharis of Erev Pesach – there is no LaM’natzei’ach even though the korban Pesach is not sacrificed until after midday.

The Shulchan Aruch (Orach Chayim 131:4) rules that Tachanun is not recited in the “house of the chasan” but does not elaborate further, nor does the Shulchan Aruch explain whether Tachanun is recited before the wedding itself occurs. The Rama (Orach Chayim 131:4), however, adds that a chasan is called a “chasan” on the day that he gets married, seemingly adopting the opinion of the T’rumas HaDeshen that Tachanun is not recited where there is a chasan in attendance who is getting married later that day.

The Pri Chadash (cited in Ba’er Heiteiv, 131:15), on the other hand, disagrees. Since the chasan is not yet married, he is not yet a chasan, and therefore Tachanun is recited. 

The Mishnah B’rurah (ibid 21) cites two opinions whether Tachanun is recited where there is a chasan in attendance who is getting married later that day.

The Aruch HaShulchan (131:16) adopts the opinion that Tachanun is not recited where there is a chasan in attendance who is getting married later that day.

II. Contemporary Rulings

In practice, the Chazon Ish (Orchos Rabbeinu, Vol. 3) ruled that Tachanun is recited during Shacharis where there is a chasan in attendance who is getting married later that day. Indeed, Rav Moshe Feinstein zt”l (see Divrei Chachamim, p. 79) is quoted as ruling that Tachanun is recited even during Minchah, unless Minchah is recited at the wedding hall.

However, other contemporary poskim disagree. Specifically, the Halichos Shlomo (11:11) and the Sheivet HaLevi (7:18) rule that Tachanun is not recited where there is a chasan in attendance who is getting married later that day. Indeed, the sefer Chayei HaLevi (2:15) notes that this is the prevailing custom – not to recite Tachanun.

III. The Chasan Himself

Notably, even the Pri Chadash agrees that the chasan himself does not recite Tachanun on the day of his wedding, even during Shacharis. See Ohr Yisrael Journal (Vol. 34, p. 231-232), citing the Minchas Aharon. The whole discussion above only pertains to the rest of the minyan.

IV. The Post-Sh’kiah Wedding

According to the opinion that Tachanun is not recited where there is a chasan in attendance who is getting married later that day, what about when the wedding occurs after sh’kiah, during the evening? Is Tachanun still not recited during Shacharis?

The Sheivet HaLevi (ibid) rules that in this situation, Tachanun is recited. However, he notes that if Minchah occurs in the wedding hall, then there is room to be lenient and not to recite Tachanun, even if the chupah will not occur before sh’kiah.

Rav Moshe Sternbuch shlita (cited in sefer Otzar T’shuvos 1:88), however, explains why the minhag has developed that Tachanun is not recited even when the chupah won’t take place before sh’kiah. Since the chasan fasts on the day of his wedding, even when the chupah won’t take place before sh’kiah (see previous Article #1), the day of the wedding becomes a personal Yom Kippur for the chasan. His minyan may likewise latch onto this holiday and not recite Tachanun.

Next Week’s Topic: Who should walk the chasan and kallah down the aisle to the chupah?


Rabbi Ephraim Glatt, Esq. is Assistant to the Rabbi at the Young Israel of Kew Gardens Hills and a practicing litigation attorney. Questions? Comments? Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.