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The annual American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) conference occurred this week. An event that is normally a bipartisan ground for high-ranking politicians and Presidential hopefuls from both parties to deliver remarks about the strong US-Israel alliance is now under increased scrutiny by the growing base of the socialist and intersectional left. Democrats with an eye on the Oval Office in 2020 are now catering to that base, and are increasingly at odds with their colleagues in Congress. This is causing a rift within the Democratic Party, whose support of Israel going forward is in doubt.

“Bipartisanship” was the word of the day at the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) Policy Conference early this week, with speakers and organization leadership doubling down on the notion that support for Israel requires support from both Democrats and Republicans, that it is an across-the-aisle issue; but the mood among many delegates was worry, as the sharp spike in anti-Zionist rhetoric and policy on the Democratic Party as its breakout presidential candidates tack to the hard left and the base is pulled along with it.

There is a well-known saying in sports: “Good teams find a way to win and bad teams find a way to lose.” In 2016, the Democratic Party nominated probably the only candidate whom Donald Trump could beat in an election. Trump’s negatives were the unlikability and the sleaze factor. Instead of nominating a candidate who was likable and had a stellar reputation, the Democratic Party nominated Hillary Clinton. She had the same negative traits as Trump and was an establishment figure in a non-establishment election.

On June 18, the office of special counsel, which has nothing to do with Special Counsel Robert Mueller, sent a copy of its May 30 report recommending that Kellyanne Conway be terminated for repeated violations of the Hatch Act. Not surprisingly, the president rejected the request.

In the wake of the horrific slaughter of 50 Muslims in New Zealand last week, the world came together for a moment to condemn the attacker, mourn the innocent, and reflect on the violence that hit the town of Christchurch. A moment is approximately 90-120 seconds, and that’s how long it took for many to start assigning blame for this attack on anyone but the shooter.